Too Many Long Boxes!
   
   

End of Summer
 

Emerald Archers
and Boy Bowmen

by John Wells

Pre Titans Clash

art by Chris Franklin (pencils) and Carlin Trammel (colors)

"Don't you go high-hat on me, Speedy! Why Green Arrow's nothing but Batman with a bow and arrow." -- Robin the Boy Wonder in All-Star Squadron # 31 (1983).

Leave it to Roy Thomas to have Batman's junior partner say what many kids had thought to themselves in the 1940s and 1950s. Like his concurrent creations Aquaman and Johnny Quick, Mort Weisinger had, in the form of Green Arrow and Speedy, introduced characters who owed as much to contemporary comics characters as they did to the heroes of myth.

For his part, Weisinger insisted he'd been thinking of Robin Hood and Little John when he created the Amazing Archers, not Batman and Robin. Still, one can't help but be suspicious of a series featuring a socialite and his ward, a unique vehicle (the Arrowcar) and a clown as their chief adversary (Bull's-Eye). A month after GA and Speedy's debut, the Sandman was retooled in a similar vein (Adventure Comics # 69), soon adding a deluxe car to his arsenal as well (Adventure # 76).

Initially, the parallels between Batman and Green Arrow consisted of their mutual kid partners, wealthy alter-egoes, trophy rooms and fancy cars. In GA's case, the vehicle was referred to as "The Arrowplane," because it virtually flew down the street (More Fun Comics # 73). It didn't become the Arrowcar until late 1943's World's Finest Comics # 12 (with the last reference to it by its original name coming a few months later in More Fun # 96). A specialized boat, the Arrowcraft, appeared once in More Fun # 78.

To put some of this in context, note that the Bat-Signal was introduced in late 1941, concurrent with Green Arrow's fourth appearance, hence the initial lack of an analogue in the Battling Bowman's strip. Like GA, Batman originally had a mere trophy room. The Batcave didn't show up until mid-1942 (Batman # 12) and wasn't named until late 1943 (Detective # 83). According to the Grand Comics Database's Bob Hughes, the Arrowcase didn't make an appearance until 1956.

Further Batman parallels didn't begin to manifest themselves until the latter half of 1946, when a clown villain called the Bull's-Eye debuted (World's Finest # 24) and quickly racked up another nine appearances (World's Finest # 25; Adventure # 113, 116, 119, 124, 126, 131, 137, 138). Next up was the addition of a regular law enforcement contact (Police Chief Weber) and a flaming Arrowsignal to summon the heroes in 1947's World's Finest # 28. 1947's Adventure # 118 introduced an Arrowplane that was actually an aircraft.

Aside from the arrowline (a shaft attached to wire), specialized arrows had been rare -- and generally makeshift -- up to that point. In a competition against other weapons such as guns and bolos, Green Arrow found that he had to expand his arsenal and added the Boomerang Arrow and Dynamite Arrow in that story (Adventure # 108). In 1947, the novelty arrows began to proliferate with a Boxing Glove Arrow (Adventure # 118), Incendiary Arrow (# 120) and a red-flagged Matador Arrow (# 124), culminating with an episode in which the Battling Bowmen reflected on their unique arrows (# 126).

Notably absent in the 1940s episodes, though, were the Arrowcave, Oliver Queen's mansion and even the name of GA's home town. Oliver and Roy's home was explicitly identified as an apartment as late as 1945's More Fun # 104 but the first hint that they might live somewhere else came in 1948's Adventure # 127, which referred to their "secret basement gym." Oliver's status as a wealthy man was implied frequently with appearances by wealthy friends and business concerns and even one reference to him as a "socialite" (More Fun # 95) but it was never clear precisely how rich he was.

Early on, Green Arrow's base of operations was named as Manhattan (More Fun # 73 and 86). Another story was set partially in Gotham City (More Fun # 94) but there was no indication that GA lived there. After that, though, the city simply wasn't named at all, at least into 1948. Star City would seem to have been christened later.

Green Arrow and Speedy had clearly been designated for stardom from the start. They not only held the cover spot in More Fun but also served as part of the Seven Soldiers of Victory in Leading Comics. By the end of 1944, the honeymoon was over. The Amazing Archers made their pentultimate cover appearance on More Fun # 101, an issue that introduced Superboy to a waiting world. The duo shared their final cover (# 103) with a comedic pair named Dover and Clover, destined to be the book's new flagship feature when it switched to an all humor format. Green Arrow followed Superboy and More Fun's other super-hero features to a new home in Adventure Comics but they'd never hold the cover again in the Golden Age.

Illustrating Weisinger's script in More Fun Comics # 73's "Case of the Namesake Murders" was George Papp, whose art would symbolize Green Arrow through much of the 1940s and 1950s. Papp's initial tenure on the strip ended with issue # 84 in the latter half of 1942 and pencillers Cliff Young and Maurice DelBurgo replaced him for the duration of World War Two. Papp returned to the feature, now seen in Adventure and World's Finest, in late 1945 and remained until 1958's "Man Who Hated Arrows" (Adventure # 249) and "Green Arrow Vs. Red Dart" (World's Finest # 95). Reassigned to the Superboy series, Papp returned to Green Arrow two more times, once in a 1959 cross-over with the Boy of Steel (Adventure # 269) and again with Batman in 1967's The Brave and The Bold # 71.

Jack Kirby followed Papp with a dozen stories through the end of 1958 (Adventure # 250-256 and World's Finest # 96-99). Foremost among them was a brand new origin for the Emerald Archer in Adventure # 256. The story explained how shipwrecked Oliver Queen had learned archery skills to survive on a deserted island. The original account, an after-the-fact episode in More Fun # 89, had established Queen as an archaeologist and specialist on Indian lore who discovered an orphaned bowman named Roy Harper and a fortune in gold in one fell swoop.

Lee Elias picked up the pencilling chores from Kirby in 1959. Highlights of his run included a revised origin for Speedy (Adventure # 262), cross-overs with Superman and Aquaman (Adventure # 266-267) and three appearances by Miss Arrowette, the latest female rival for the duo (World's Finest # 113, 118, 134). It was also Elias who helped turn out the lights on the strip when the venerable Aquaman and Green Arrow back-ups, which had survived without interruption into the Silver Age, were finally discontinued. Destined for limbo, the GA series closed in early 1964 with the ironically titled "Land of No Return" (World's Finest # 140).

Aquaman's fortunes had been on an upswing, thanks to charter membership in 1959's Justice League of America and a trial run in Showcase that led to his own comic book. GA, on the other hand, had been an afterthought in the League (joining in JLA # 4) and the closest he came to a try-out was a team-up with the Martian Manhunter late in the summer of 1963 (The Brave and The Bold # 50).

The Brave and The Bold, though, was the title where Green Arrow would be reborn. A one-two punch in 1969 brought the Emerald Archer a new look (courtesy of Neal Adams in B&B # 85) and a new attitude (thanks to Denny O'Neil in JLA # 75). When O'Neil and Adams finally joined forces on 1970's Green Lantern # 76, the result was dynamite! If "Green Lantern/Green Arrow" had been more of a critical success than a financial one, it surely helped to reestablish Green Arrow as a viable character for the 1970s.

Green Arrow went on to a solo series in Action Comics # 421, written by Elliot S. Maggin, following up on an acclaimed first script in Green Lantern # 87. Black Canary, who'd been moving towards a romance with GA every since JLA # 75, ultimately became a full-fledged co-star in the strip (Action # 441), coinciding with the arrival of Mike Grell as artist.

GA and the series had enough of a buzz for DC to commission two separate Grell-illustrated team-up vehicles for him in 1976, one with Black Canary (by Maggin) and the other with Green Lantern (by O'Neil). The cancellation of First Issue Special put both episodes in limbo, though DC opted to use the latter as the first issue of the revived Green Lantern (# 90) that spring. DC had intended to return the book to Green Lantern alone after the initial three issues but sales figures on issue # 90 suggested otherwise and Green Arrow was hastily scripted into the transitional GL # 93.

Meanwhile, the Green Arrow/Black Canary strip, which had left Action when it seemed they were going to get their own series, returned in January of 1977 as part of the revamped World's Finest. Gerry Conway provided scripts for the run though Maggin and Grell's sidelined episode was finally published at the end of the year in Green Lantern # 100.

As 1980 neared, GA began to fall on hard times. O'Neil wrote him out of Green Lantern (with # 123) and Conway dropped him from Justice League of America (in # 181-182). He held onto his solo strip, though, even as another retooling forced him from World's Finest (with # 284) to Detective (with # 521) in 1982. A four-issue mini-series by Mike W. Barr, Trevor Von Eeden and Dick Giordano in 1983 finally gave the Emerald Archer the trial outing that he'd long been denied but nothing came of it.

Green Arrow actually died in the final issue of Crisis On Infinite Earths in 1985 though readers could take small comfort in the fact that this was not the Emerald Archer who regularly worked with Black Canary. Rather, he was the Golden Age hero who'd appeared with the Seven Soldiers of Victory and been revived in 1972's Justice League of America # 101.

Mike Grell, in the capacity of writer-artist, brought a darker edge to the Silver Age hero in a 1987 trilogy called The Longbow Hunters that recast Green Arrow as something of an urban hunter. The success of the mini-series finally brought GA an ongoing solo title in 1988 and Grell continued to write the series through # 80 (1993).

The continuation of the title played to the worst elements of the 1990s, spinning off developments in Grell's final issues to portray Green Arrow as a womanizing, murderous pathetic figure, someone ripe for replacement by a young successor. The introduction of Oliver Queen's long-lost son Connor Hawke in 1994's Green Arrow # 0 culminated with his formal takeover of the Green Arrow persona a year later in GA # 101. With a nod towards Frank Miller's Dark Knight, in which Oliver Queen was depicted with one arm, GA # 100 had set up a deathtrap in which Green Arrow could only escape a shackle by severing his hand. With no other options, he took his own life in # 101.

The series continued into late 1998 before being cancelled with # 137 and a final "one-millionth" issue, episodes that set up the inevitable return of Oliver Queen in a new series by film director Kevin Smith. In the meantime, the classic beardless Green Arrow continues to surface in a succession of flashback projects, among them JLA: Year One, The Silver Age and the O'Neil-scripted Legends of the DC Universe # 7-9 and Legends of the Dark Knight # 127-131. As expected, Kevin Smith and Phil Hester returned Ollie Queen from the grave in 2001's Green Arrow revival with a spectacular reception from the readership.

Smith also effectively addressed the Batman parallels in a sequence in GA # 6. After Green Arrow saves the Dark Knight from the demonic flame of Etrigan with a fire extinguisher arrow, Batman replies, "I will never ... ever ... mock your trick arrows."

Green Arrow's comics appearances include:

Green Arrow (Oliver Queen; Earth-Two):

Adventure Comics # 103-196, 438-439, 443

All-Star Squadron # 29, 31, 32 (behind the scenes), 53-54, 56, 59-60

The Amazing World of DC Comics # 14 (text)

Crisis On Infinite Earths # 5, 7, 9-10, 12

Infinity, Inc. # 11, 23

Justice League of America # 100-102

Leading Comics # 1-14

More Fun Comics # 73-107

Who's Who '85 # 9

World's Finest Comics # 7-70

Green Arrow (Oliver Queen; Earth-One):

Action Comics # 314, 350, 365, 421, 424, 426, 428, 431, 434, 436-437, 440-441, 443-446, 449 (feature), 450-452, 455-458, 480-481, 482 (behind the scenes), 483, 512, 513 (behind the scenes), 535, 546

Adventure Comics # 197-205, 207-208, 210-269, 419, 423, 464

The Amazing World of DC Comics # 14 (text)

Aquaman [first series] # 18

The Atom # 8

Batman # 260

Batman and the Outsiders # 1

The Brave and The Bold # 50, 71, 85, 100, 106, 129-130, 136, 144, 168, 185

Crisis On Infinite Earths # 5, 9

DC Comics Presents # 20, 54

DC Comics Presents Annual # 2

DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

DC Special Series # 10

DC Super-Stars # 10, 17

Detective Comics # 466, 468, 521-525, 527-554, 556-560

The Flash # 175, 199, 204, 217-219, 327-329

Green Arrow [first series] # 1-4

Green Lantern [second series] # 76-87, 89-124, 165, 180, 188, 190, 191 (behind the scenes), 194

The Joker # 4

Justice League of America # 4-24, 25 (behind the scenes), 26-29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40-41, 44-45, 49 (behind the scenes), 50, 52-53, 55-57, 59-61, 63, 65-66, 68-69, 71-72, 74-75, 77-83, 86, 88-92, 94-95, 97-98, 100, 101 (behind the scenes), 102-110, 112, 114, 116-117, 119-124, 127-130, 132-133, 135, 136 (behind the scenes), 137, 139-148, 150-151, 153-155, 157, 159-168, 170, 173-174, 177-182, 186, 194-195, 200-202,

204-206, 209-216, 218, 224-230

Justice League of America Annual # 1-3

Limited Collectors' Edition # C-41

Red Tornado # 3

The Saga of Swamp Thing # 24

The Secret Society of Super-Villains # 5-6

Super Friends # 3, 7-9

Supergirl [second series] # 20

Superman [first series] # 199, 236

The Superman Family # 207

Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane # 29, 74

Teen Titans [first series] # 4 (behind the scenes), 25, 53

Who's Who '85 # 9

Wonder Woman [first series] # 214-215, 217-223, 300

World's Finest Comics # 71-134, 136, 138, 140, 189, 201, 210, 244-259, 261-270, 272-284, 286-287, 300, 302

Green Arrow (Earth-32):

Adventure Comics # 209

The Amazing World of DC Comics # 4-5

DC Challenge # 12

JLA 80-Page Giant # 2

Super Powers [second series] # 1-2, 5-6

Super Powers Collection (toy premiums) # 16, 18, 21, 23

Green Arrow (current):

Action Comics Weekly # 606, 609, 612

Arsenal # 3

The Batman Chronicles # 7

Batman/Green Arrow: The Poison Tomorrow

Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight # 127-131

Batman Plus # 1

Black Canary [first series] # 1; [second series] # 2, 5, 6 (behind the scenes), 8

Bloodbath # 1

The Brave and The Bold [second series] # 1-6

The Butcher # 4-5

Checkmate! # 25

Deathstroke, the Terminator # 39

Detective Comics # 561-567

Eclipso # 16-18

Flash & Green Lantern: The Brave and The Bold # 4

Green Arrow [second series] # 1-90, 0, 91-101, 106-107, 109-110, 112, 116-117, 121, 137; [third series] 1-on

Green Arrow Annual # 1-7

Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters # 1-3

Green Arrow: The Wonder Year # 1-4

Green Lantern [third series] # 46 (behind the scenes), 47, 63-64

Green Lantern Corps Quarterly # 5 (flashback)

Green Lantern: Mosaic # 16 (flashback)

Green Lantern Vs. Aliens # 1

Hourman # 8, 16

Impulse # 28

JLA # 24 (flashback)

JLA 80-Page Giant # 1-2

JLA: Incarnations # 1-3

JLA Secret Files # 2 (mention), 3 (text)

JLA: Year One # 2, 5, 7 (behind the scenes), 8, 11-12

Justice League America # 40, 64 (flashback), 70

Justice League of America # 250

Justice League Task Force # 5-6

Legends of the DC Universe # 7-9, 12-13

Millennium # 1-4, 5 (behind the scenes), 7-8

Mister Miracle [second series] # 17

The New Titans Annual # 5 (behind the scenes)

The Question # 17-18

The Question Annual # 1-2

Secret Origins [third series] # 22 (flashback), 27 (flashback), 30 (flashback), 37 (flashback), 38, 50

Secret Origins Annual # 3 (flashback)

Secret Origins 80-Page Giant # 1

Showcase '96 # 5

Silver Age # 1

Silver Age 80-Page Giant # 1

Silver Age: Green Lantern # 1

Silver Age Secret Files # 1

Silver Age: The Brave and The Bold # 1

Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. # 9

Suicide Squad # 44

Superman [second series] # 83

Superman: The Man of Steel # 20

Superman: Man of Steel Annual # 1 (flashback)

Who's Who '88 # 1

Who's Who '92 # 14

Young Justice # 34 (mention)

Zero Hour: Crisis In Time # 4-3, 1-0

Green Arrow (variants):

Action Comics # 350, 583, 635

Adventures In The DC Universe # 16

Adventures of Superman # 444

Adventures of Superman Annual # 6

The Amazing World of DC Comics # 15

Batman: Holy Terror

Batman: Mitefall

Batman: The Dark Knight # 4

Batman: The Doom That Came To Gotham # 1-3

Bizarro Comics

The Brave and The Bold # 56

Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew # 14

Chronos # 7

Detective Comics # 347, 408

Flash Annual # 7

Flashpoint # 3

Green Arrow # 90, 127, 129

JLA: The Nail # 1

JLA/Titans # 2

JLX # 1

Justice League America # 72-75

Justice League of America # 16, 114

Kingdom Come # 2-4

Kingdom Come: Revelations (text)

League of Justice # 1-2

Legends of the DC Universe # 33

Legends of the DCU: Crisis On Infinite Earths # 1

Silver Age # 1

Silver Age: Green Lantern # 1

Silver Age: Justice League of America # 1

Sovereign Seven Annual # 2

Superman [first series] # 149, 192; [second series] 138

Superman and Batman: Generations II # 1

Superman and Batman: World's Funnest

The Superman Family # 194

Superman/Wonder Woman: Whom Gods Destroy # 4

Superman's Girl Friend, Lois Lane # 82, 93, 111

Teen Titans [second series] # 12

World's Finest Comics # 178, 184, 231

Unlike his partner, Speedy actually had three origins, one in 1943 (More Fun # 89), one in 1959 (Adventure # 262) and a forgotten third one in 1954 (Adventure # 209). Each version had an orphaned Roy raised and trained in archery by an Indian mentor (variously Quoag, Chief Thunderhead or Brave Bow) but the similarities largely ended there.

Just as Green Arrow had been slighted in the formation of the Justice League, Speedy was an also-ran when it came time to create the Teen Titans. Unlike the other members, he had no regular series and appeared in only two guest shots (Teen Titans # 4 and 11) before replacing Aqualad in 1968's TT # 19. He saw more action on the 1960s animated Teen Titans cartoon, where he stood in for Robin. Bob Rozakis retroactively established Speedy as a charter member of the team in 1977's TT # 53.

Simultaneously with his appearances in the early 1970s issues of Teen Titans, Roy Harper also made a controversial appearance in Green Lantern # 85-86's "Snowbirds Don't Fly." The landmark anti-drug story revealed that "nice clean middle class kid" Speedy was hooked on dope!

Denny O'Neil defended the decision in Amazing World of DC Comics # 4. "We had a total of like 44 pages to work with and that was not really enough room to create a character from scratch, build sympathy for him, get him addicted, kick, and also add action and plot. The only way to go was with a character already established and Speedy was the logical choice."

The post-"Snowbirds" relationship between Oliver and Roy figured into a few later 1970s stories, including Maggin's Action # 436 and Green Lantern # 100 and Conway's World's Finest # 251.

Marv Wolfman put a positive spin on Speedy's bout with addiction by making him a drug enforcement officer for the government in 1981's Best of DC # 81, a development he used to good effect in a 1983 New Teen Titans drug awareness giveaway. Not content with simply making Roy Harper an anti-drug advocate, Wolfman also seemed to cast him as a poster child for Planned Parenthood when 1986's New Teen Titans # 20-21 revealed that he'd fathered a daughter, Lian, by the villainess Cheshire.

The picture of Speedy as a sober drug agent and responsible single father began to be chipped away in the 1990s. His progression to the "adult" identity of Arsenal in New Titans # 99 ironically signalled the beginning of a more immature portrayal of Roy Harper. As Arsenal, Roy's low self-esteem and loser status have been brought to the forefront as never before.

Speedy still makes the odd appearance in untold tales, among them the Teen Titans flashbacks in Sins of Youth Secret Files # 1, Silver Age: Teen Titans # 1 and Teen Titans [second series] # 12. A 1999 mock-up of a Silver Age 80-Page Giant (Teen Titans Annual (1967)) even included a reconstruction of an episode of the 1960s Titans cartoon. Interestingly, JLA: Year One # 11-12 established that, in DC's revised history, Speedy predates Robin by at least a year. Take that, Boy Wonder!

Speedy's comics appearances include:

Speedy (Roy Harper; Earth-Two):

Adventure Comics # 103-196, 438-439, 443

All-Star Squadron # 29, 31, 32 (behind the scenes), 53 (behind the scenes), 59-60

Infinity, Inc. # 11

Justice League of America # 100-102

Leading Comics # 1-14

More Fun Comics # 73-107

Who's Who '86 # 21

World's Finest Comics # 7-70

Speedy (Earth-One):

Action Comics # 436, 449 (feature)

Adventure Comics # 197-205, 207-208, 210-269

The Best of DC # 18

The Brave and The Bold # 50, 83, 102, 149

Crisis On Infinite Earths # 9-10

DC Special Series # 11

Detective Comics # 402

Green Lantern [second series] # 84 (behind the scenes), 85-86, 100, 110 (behind the scenes)

The Hawk and The Dove [first series] # 5

Justice League of America # 13

The New Teen Titans [first series] # 27, 29-32

The New Teen Titans drug awareness giveaway # 1

Super Friends # 6 (behind the scenes)

The Superman Family # 192-194

Tales of the Teen Titans # 50

Teen Titans [first series] # 4, 11, 19-37, 39-53

Who's Who '86 # 21

World's Finest Comics # 71-134, 136, 138, 140, 205, 251

Speedy (Earth-32):

Adventure Comics # 209

Speedy (current):

Action Comics Weekly # 613-618, 627-634, 636-640

Armageddon 2001 # 2

Arsenal # 1, 3

Batman Plus # 1

Deathstroke, the Terminator # 18-20 (Harper)

Green Arrow [third series] # 1

Green Arrow Annual # 2 (Who's Who)

Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters # 1

Hawk and Dove [third series] # 11-12, 26

Impulse # 28

JLA 80-Page Giant # 2

JLA: Year One # 11-12

Legends of the DC Universe # 12

The New Teen Titans [second series] # 19-21, 24

The New Titans # 52, 56, 60-66, 68-69, 71, 97-98 (Harper)

The New Titans Annual # 6

Nightwing Secret Files # 1

Secret Origins [third series] # 13, 38, 50

Secret Origins Annual # 3

Secret Origins 80-Page Giant # 1

Silver Age # 1

Silver Age 80-Page Giant # 1

Silver Age: Teen Titans # 1

Sins of Youth Secret Files # 1

Suicide Squad [first series] # 11-12

Teen Titans [second series] # 12

The Titans # 25, 30

Who's Who '90 # 3

Speedy (current -- as Arsenal):

Action Comics # 744, 781

Adventures of Superman # 557

Aquaman [fifth series] # 60

Arsenal # 1-4

Arsenal Special # 1

Batman Plus # 1

Bloodbath # 1-2

Blood Pack # 3

Damage # 5-6, 8, 10, 13, 16

The Darkstars # 30-32, 34

DC One Million # 1-3

Deathstroke # 48-49

Deathstroke Annual # 4

Deathstroke, the Hunted # 45

Genesis # 1

The Flash [second series] # 142, 159

Green Arrow [second series] # 75, 97-99, 101; [third series] 1, 5-6

Green Lantern [third series] # 57, 59, 65, 128

Green Lantern: Circle of Fire # 1

Guy Gardner: Warrior # 29, 39

Impulse: Bart Saves The Universe

JLA # 40

JLA: Gods and Monsters

JLA: Our Worlds At War # 1

JLA Secret Files # 3

JLA/Titans # 1-3

The New Titans # 99-108, 110-112, 114, 0, 115-130

The New Titans Annual # 9, 11

Nightwing Annual # 1

Outsiders [second series] # 17

The Power of Shazam! # 41

Resurrection Man # 26

Secret Files & Origins Guide to the DC Universe 2000 # 1

Showcase '94 # 7

Showcase '95 # 8

Sins of Youth Secret Files # 1

Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. # 8

Superboy [third series] # 80-82

Superman [second series] # 134, M

Superman: The Man of Steel # 79, M

Teen Titans [second series] # 12-20

Titans # 1-6, 8-28, 30-32

Titans/Legion of Super-Heroes: Universe Ablaze # 1-4

Titans Secret Files # 1-2

World's Finest: Our Worlds At War # 1

Young Justice: Sins of Youth # 1-2

Zero Hour: Crisis In Time # 3, 0

Speedy (variants):

Adventures In The DC Universe # 16

The Flash [second series] # 165

JLA: Act of God # 3

Kingdom Come # 2-4

Kingdom Come: Revelations (text)

The New Titans Annual # 10

Nightwing # 10

Speed Demon # 1

Superboy [third series] # 87

Superman and Batman: World's Funnest

Teen Titans [second series] # 12-13

Teen Titans Annual (1967) # 1

Teen Titans Spotlight # 10

Thrillkiller '62

Titans # 16

The Titans Secret Files # 2

Wild Times: Gen13 # 1

Wonder Woman [second series] # 126

Young Justice # 35

Green Arrow Reprints:

Among the less familiar names on the following listing is that of Flashback, which was a series of black and white facsimile comics published by Alan Light in the 1970s. Secret Origins of Super DC Heroes was a 1976 book published by Harmony Books. It represents the only place that readers can find reprints of the origins of the Golden Age Atom and, yes, Green Arrow.

It's also interesting to note that, up to this point, seven of Jack Kirby's twelve Green Arrow stories have been reprinted, specifically those from Adventure # 250, 252-254, 256 and World's Finest # 97-98. That situation will be rectified in the near future when all of Kirby's GA stories are collected in a single volume.

Action Comics:

# 428: "The Plot to Kill Black Canary" -- The Best of DC # 48; DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

# 431: "The Case of the Runaway Shoebox" -- Detective Comics # 555

Adventure Comics:

# 174: "1,001 Ways to Defeat Green Arrow" -- The Brave and The Bold # 117

# 176: "The Rogue of 1,000 Ropes" -- World's Finest Comics # 204

# 246: "The Rainbow Archer" -- Four Star Spectacular # 5

# 247: "The 13 Superstition Arrows" -- DC Silver Age Classics: Adventure Comics # 247

# 248: "The World's Three Most Dangerous Arrows" -- The Brave and The Bold # 113

# 250: "The Green Arrows of the World" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

# 252: "The Mystery of the Giant Arrows" -- Action Comics # 449; DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23; Greatest 1950s Stories Ever Told

# 253: "Prisoners of Dimension Zero" -- Action Comics # 449 (pages 2-6); DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23; Greatest 1950s Stories Ever Told

# 254: "The Green Arrow's Last Stand" -- Super-Team Family # 9

# 256: "The Green Arrow's First Case" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 9; Secret Origins of Super DC Heroes; World's Finest Comics # 187

# 259: "The Green Arrow's Mystery Pupil" -- World's Finest Comics # 154

# 260: "Green Arrow's New Partner" -- Teen Titans # 38

# 262: "The World's Worst Archer" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 9; World's Finest Comics # 188

# 263: "Have Arrow, Will Travel" -- Teen Titans # 35

# 266: "The Case of the Vanishing Arrows" -- Super-Team Family # 2; World's Finest Comics # 143

# 267: "The Underwater Archers" -- Greatest Team-Up Stories Ever Told; Super-Team Family # 3; World's Finest Comics # 145

DC Super-Stars:

# 17: "Green Arrow" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters:

# 1: "The Hunters" -- Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters (trade paperback)

# 2: "Dragon Hunt" -- Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters (tpb)

# 3: "Tracking Snow" -- Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters (tpb)

Green Lantern [second series]:

# 87: "What Can One Man Do ?" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23; Green Lantern/Green Arrow # 6; Green Lantern/Green Arrow: Hard-Traveling Heroes # 2

More Fun Comics:

# 73: ("The Namesake Murders") -- Millennium Edition: More Fun Comics # 73

# 89: "The Birth of the Battling Bowmen" -- Secret Origins of Super DC Heroes

# 101: "Formula For Doom" -- Millennium Edition: More Fun Comics # 101

World's Finest Comics:

# 7: "Wings of Flame" -- Flashback # 28

# 8: "The Unluckiest Man In the World" -- Flashback # 38

# 71: "The Invisible Death" -- Millennium Edition: World's Finest Comics # 71

# 94: "Green Arrow Vs. Red Dart" -- The Best of DC # 10

# 97: "The Menace of the Mechanical Octopus" -- DC Special Series # 23

# 98: "The Unmasked Archers" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23; World's Finest Comics # 197

# 100: "The Case of the Green Error Clown" -- World's Finest Comics # 159

# 102: "The Case of the Camouflage King" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

# 111: "The Crimes of the Clock King" -- Wanted! # 1

# 113: "The Amazing Miss Arrowette" -- DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23

Other Green Arrow and Speedy Landmark Reprints:

The Brave and The Bold:

# 85: "The Senator's Been Shot" -- Best of The Brave and The Bold # 1; DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest # 23; Millennium Edition: The Brave and The Bold # 85

Green Lantern:

# 76: "No Evil Shall Escape My Sight" -- DC Silver Age Classics: Green Lantern # 76; Green Lantern/Green Arrow (1972 paperback) # 1; Green Lantern/Green Arrow # 1; Green Lantern/Green Arrow: Hard-Traveling Heroes # 1; Greatest Team-Up Stories Ever Told; Millennium Edition: Green Lantern # 76

# 85: "Snowbirds Don't Fly" -- Green Lantern/Green Arrow # 5; Green Lantern/Green Arrow: Hard-Traveling Heroes # 2

# 86: "They Say It'll Kill Me...But They Won't Say When" -- Green Lantern/Green Arrow # 6; Green Lantern/Green Arrow: Hard-Traveling Heroes # 2

Justice League of America:

# 4: "Doom of the Star Diamond" -- Justice League of America # 67; Justice League of America Archives # 1

# 75: "In Each Man, There Is A Demon" -- The Best of DC # 31

Teen Titans:

# 4: "The Secret Olympic Heroes" -- Action Comics # 409 (pages 1-13), 410 (pages 14-24); Teen Titans Annual (1967) # 1

John "Mikishawm" Wells, the pride of Batavia, Iowa, is a lifelong comics fan, working his way forward from Disneys in 1969 to newspaper strips in 1973 to SHAZAM! and the rest of the DC Universe in 1974. During the 1980s, he began compiling a lists of DC character appearances, a massive database that he's tapped into when writing articles for publications such as the DC Index series, Amazing Heroes, The Comics Buyer’s Guide, Comic Effect, Comic Book Marketplace, It’s A Fanzine, The O‘Neil Observer and, of course, Fanzing. He is Kurt Busiek's unofficial reference guide, as the keen-eyed may have noticed in Power Company #2.

 
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